Our staff values families as central to children's health.

Pediatric/Adolescent Center

Outpatient Tests/Procedures

Voiding Cysto-Urethragram (VCUG)

VCUG involves x-rays of the bladder and urethra while filling and emptying.

The nurse will insert a catheter (thin flexible tube) in through the urethra into the bladder. Liquid contrast (substance that shows up well on X-ray) will be instilled through the catheter into the bladder.

Some children may be medicated to relax them during the catheter insertion and procedure. If medicated, an RN will continue to monitor your child until discharged to home.

Click to learn more about sedation preparation.

 

Top of Page

 

 

 

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

MRI produces very clear images of the human body using a big magnet and radio waves. It does not use X-rays. Learn more about MRI

Clothing must not have metal snaps, zippers metallic threads, or other metal. You will be asked to fill out an MRI screening form.

It is very important for young children to be still for their MRI, as even slight motion degrades the images. Some children may be given a medication, if ordered by the doctor, to sedate them during the test. An IV (small tube inserted into the vein) will be started to be used to inject contrast (material shows up well on MRI). An RN will stay with your child during the test and monitor him/her until discharge.

Click to learn more about sedation preparation.

 

Top of Page

 

 

 

Electroencephalography (EEG)

EEG involves electrodes attached to the head to study the electrical activity of the brain. Learn more about EEG

It is very important for young children to be still or asleep for their EEG, as even slight motion degrades the images. Some children may be given a medication, if ordered by the doctor, to sedate them during the test. An RN will monitor him/her until discharge.

Click to learn more about sedation preparation.

 

Top of Page

 

 

 

Echocardiogram (Echo)

Echocardiogram uses sound waves (ultrasound) to evaluate the heart.

Learn more about  Echo

It is very important for young children to be still or asleep for their Echo. Some children may be given a medication, if ordered by the doctor, to sedate them during the test. An RN will monitor him/her until discharge.

Click to learn more about sedation preparation.

 

Top of Page

 

 

 

Computed Tomography Scan (CT Scan)

CT Scan uses special x-ray equipment to obtain detailed pictures of bone, structures, organs, or tissue inside the body.

Learn more about CT Scan

Clothing must not have metal snaps, zippers, metallic threads, or other metal.  It is very important to be still for their CT Scan, even slight motion degrades the images. Some children may be given a medication, if ordered by the doctor, to relax them during the test. An IV (small tube inserted into the vein) may be started if contrast (substance shows up well on CT Scan) is indicated. If your child has been medicated, an RN will monitor her/him until discharged to home.

Click to learn more about sedation preparation.

 

Top of Page

 

 

 

Nuclear Scans

Nuclear scans use radioactive isotopes in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Including, but not limited to

• Bone scan

• Gastric empty study

• Lung perfusion

• Meckel’s scan

• Renal scan

• VCUG

Learn more about nuclear scans

It is very important for children to be still for their Nuclear Scan. Some children may be given a medication, if ordered by the doctor, to relax them during the test. An IV (small tube inserted into the vein) will be inserted to inject isotopes. If your child has been medicated, an RN will monitor her/him until discharged to home.

Click to learn more about sedation preparation.

 

Top of Page

 

 

Clean-Out Procedure

Your child’s doctor may order this procedure for constipation and encopresis. A nasogastric tube (flexible tube inserted into the nose and down to the stomach) allows us to instill several liters of an electrolyte solution for bowel cleansing. Some children may be given a medication, if ordered by the doctor, to relax them during the insertion of the tube. An RN will monitor her/him until discharged to home.

Click to learn more about sedation preparation.

 

Top of Page

 

 

Bronchoscopy & Endoscopy

Learn more about bronchoscopy

Learn more about endoscopy

 

An IV (small tube inserted into the vein) will be started by a Registered Nurse (RN), and the doctor will give a sedation medication through the IV. Your child will be monitored by the RN throughout the procedure. The procedure generally takes approximately 1 hour.

Your child will return to his/her room and continue to be monitored until he/she is fully awake and taking liquids well. Then your child is discharged home. It is not unusual for your child to have a croupy or congested cough after the bronchoscopy.

Click to learn more about sedation preparation.

 

Top of Page

 

Sedation Preparation

FOOD & DRINK

Ages 0-6 months - your child cannot have anything to eat or drink, including water 2 hours prior to the test. He/she may have clear liquids (water, apple juice, etc.) or breast milk 2-4 hours prior to the test.

 

Ages 6-24 months - your child cannot have anything to eat or drink, including water for 4 hours prior to the test. He/she may have clear liquids (water, apple juice, etc.) or breast milk 4-6 hours prior to the test. No solid food, milk or formula for 6 hours before the test.

 

Ages 2 years and up - your child may have nothing to eat or drink, including water for 6 hours before the test.  

 

SLEEP

To help us in sedating your child for the test, it is helpful for your child to be sleepy before arriving at the hospital. We recommend putting your child to bed late in the evening before the test and waking them up early the morning of the test. It is also helpful if your child does not nap prior to the test.  

 

TIME

Be prepared to stay at the hospital for about 4-6 hours for your child’s procedure. One to two hours are needed prior to the procedure for admitting information, starting an IV (small tube inserted into the vein) and giving sedation. The procedure may take approximately 20 minutes up to 2 hours depending on the type of test being performed. Recovery time may be approximately 2 hours after the procedure, depending on the procedure and the sedation medication that is used. Speech, posture, hand control, and walking may be markedly regressed for twenty four hours.

Top of Page


 

Links

Find a doctor

American Academy of Family Physicians

Center for Disease Control

Health Finder - Health Library

State of NH Immunization Program

The Manchester Asthma Coalition - Local resources for
asthmatics and their families

NH Asthma Program - Local, state, and national resources for asthmatics

 

Top of Page